Pretty thrilled to see a long review of Angie Bongiolatti posted at The Comics Journal this morning.

The review mentions me talking in an interview about my inability to give this book a great “elevator pitch”. Recently, in my classic neurotic way, I’ve wondered if many of my attempts to explain the work might have been more of a hindrance than a help in trying to get across what I was trying to do with this comic.

I feel like too many times I’ve suggested that this book was simply an exploration of reactionary politics for me. I mentioned more than once about my experience of becoming an American citizen, and made the joke about me going through this “Captain America” patriotic phase during that time. That’s funny and all, but it isn’t explaining what I was really trying to wrestle with in the story, which were the concepts of free enterprise and capitalism, whether those systems are good or evil and for whom, or if it’s even possible to categorically define a whole system that way when people experience it from many different perspectives. I’m not sure I’ve ever used either of those phrases in a conversation about the book, which is a shame.
The Origin of The Face: Part Three - The Conclusion

(Part One)(Part Two)


Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Three - The Conclusion

(Part One)(Part Two)


Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Three - The Conclusion

(Part One)(Part Two)


Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Three - The Conclusion

(Part One)(Part Two)


Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

The Origin of The Face: Part Three - The Conclusion

(Part One)
(Part Two)


Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

The Origin of The Face: Part Two

(Part One Here)

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Two

(Part One Here)

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Two

(Part One Here)

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part Two

(Part One Here)

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

The Origin of The Face: Part Two

(Part One Here)

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

Brooklyn Book Festival 2014 - First Comics & Graphic Novel Speakers

bkbfcomics:

AMAZING NEW NAMES ADDED TO BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL COMICS LINE-UP! 

Announcing the Brooklyn Book Festival 2014’s Comics & Graphic Novel Guest Speakers SO FAR…  

Gabrielle Bell, Charles Burns, Roz Chast, Michael Cho, Jerry Craft, Jennifer Cruté, Eleanor Davis, Farel Dalyrmple, Mike Dawson, Jules Feiffer, Liana Finck, Brandon Graham, Simon Hanselman, Ben Hatke, Dan Mishkin, Paul Pope, Jon Porcellino, Amy Reeder, Vivek Tiwary, Anya Ulinich, Julia Wertz…

AND MORE TO COME… Stay tuned! 

I’m very excited to be a cartoonist speaking at the Brooklyn Book Festival in September. More information to come!
The Origin of The Face: Part One

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part One

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part One

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005 The Origin of The Face: Part One

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

The Origin of The Face: Part One

Originally published in Project: Superior, 2005

santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change. santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History
There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.
Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?
2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 
3) You’re a sexist
4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion


Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”



Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point. 

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions. 

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine. 

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things. 

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic. 

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change.

santrevl:

hound-actual:

armedplatypus:

butmuhgains:

alibertarianreality:

mikedawwwson:

The Wrong Side of History

There was a small incident that occurred when I was at the CAKE comics festival a few weeks back: basically my friend Barry pointed out what seemed to be a guy with a gun inside the convention hall - which caused me to have a few moments of WTF panic, before he seemingly disappeared - and it prompted me to write this little comic.

Mike Dawson is the author of the graphic novel Angie Bongiolatti, a story about sex, socialism, and online learning.

1) why is this tagged marriage equality?

2) You have an irrational fear of firearms. 

3) You’re a sexist

4) You get angry over some really dumb stuff, let me tell you.

Stupid comic and a stupid opinion

Your comic is bad and you should feel bad.

"Right to not be terrified." What? Show me where that is written down.

Right in the bill of “muh feelings”

Fear of strangers who walk into public places holding guns isn’t irrational. It is unquestionably the most rational response possible. Gun people and their posturing about masculinity when it comes to this stuff are missing the point.

Ultimately it doesn’t matter whether you feel afraid or not. If you don’t know the person, you don’t know their intentions.

If I feel fear and you don’t - it makes no difference. If the stranger intends no harm, then we’re both in the clear. If the person plans on shooting up the place, we both suffer. Our feelings towards the gun are irrelevant.

The most common response I’ve gotten to this comic (here and elsewhere) from people who disagree with me, is that my feelings about guns make me less masculine.

This might become it’s own comic, but just to put it out there: I don’t care whether or not you think I’m manly or not, or even if I am less manly because of how I feel. I think it’s a childish way to look at things.

Unfortunately, however, it’s the lens through which the issue seems to be mostly examined through. And I think it’s this insistence on framing it as a question of masculinity is what makes it all so toxic.

People on my side of the fence can do better in this regard. The most common retort I see from anti-gun people when it comes to them encountering the enthusiasts is that the gun-nut is “compensating for something”. The gun is a penis substitute. Clearly there’s something the gun guy feels insecure about. Therefore, what’s not explicitly stated, but implied is that it’s the gun-control guy who’s the real man, because he doesn’t need to buy his penis in the sports aisle at Walmart.

But why is that better? It’s still placing the premium on manliness. It still diminishes the non-masculine, suggests they aren’t as worthy, implies that they are deficient. It still makes masculinity the primary value in the center of the debate.

The question isn’t about who the Real Men are, it’s are there reasonable things that can be done to try and reduce the number of gun deaths that happen in this country every day, every week and every year. I think there are, but as I’m stating in the comic, people who share my opinion are losing the fight. My hope is that in ten, twenty years, we will have seen that change.

Queen bassist John Deacon gazing at me from the back of an envelope

SPX afterparty conversations

The Ink Panthers Show! Summer Special 2014

Mike Dawson and Alex Robinson, feat. Tony Consiglio

Happy Summer everybody!!

Gags and Tiger Bear take a break from sunning themselves on the beach, and creep back into the steamy humid Lair to catch up and discuss some very important topics. Mostly we complain about The Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, agree that the best Godzilla movie is Cloverfield, and then fan-favorite Tony Consiglio makes an appearance!

"Cops don’t usually hassle people like you.”

Matt, Kim and Angie, gearing up to protest the World Economic Forum.

Panels from Angie Bongiolatti. "Cops don’t usually hassle people like you.”

Matt, Kim and Angie, gearing up to protest the World Economic Forum.

Panels from Angie Bongiolatti.

"Cops don’t usually hassle people like you.”

Matt, Kim and Angie, gearing up to protest the World Economic Forum.

Panels from Angie Bongiolatti.